Portrait of Private of Company F., 4th Michigan Infantry, U.S.A
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Monthly Meeting
September 25, 2013
7:30 pm

Monthly Meeting
October 23, 2013
7:30 pm

Monthly Meeting
November 20, 2013
7:30 pm

Monthly Meeting
January 29, 2014
7:30 pm

Monthly Meeting
February 26, 2014
7:30 pm

Monthly Meeting
March 26, 2014
7:30 pm

Monthly Meeting
April 30, 2014
7:30 pm

Monthly Meeting
May 28, 2014
7:30 pm

Newsletter

APRIL 2014

AND SO IT BEGINS…..AGAIN
During the Civil War, April was viewed as the “start-up” month. In the East, the armies started to leave winter quarters and prepare for the summer’s work. The Overland Campaign (May – June 1864) would start that fighting in earnest. Thousands of names would fill the newspaper columns of the killed and wounded in the coming months. The Union armies in the West were pressing on with the battles that, in some cases, had been ongoing since the first of the year and the Red River Campaign was not going well for Union General Banks. Grant, the new General-In-Chief, had decided to travel with the Army of the Potomac. They faced Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia. Another major event occurred on Tuesday, April 12th. General Nathan B. Forrest and his Confederate Cavalry assaulted Union Fort Pillow in Tennessee. Of the 557 Union soldiers (including 262 Black troops) attacked, Forrest claimed that 231 men were killed, 100 wounded and 226 captured or missing during the course of the battle. Federal sources charged that it was a “massacre” and most were killed after their capture. The casualties would continue to mount in 1864. For President Jefferson Davis, death would hit home personally. On Saturday, April 30th, the President’s five year old son, Joseph, was playing with friends in their bedroom on the second floor of the Confederate White House. Joe managed to get out on the veranda. He fell over the rail and was killed instantly. Both Lincoln and Davis lost a young son during the four years of the war.

HOW IT CAME TO BE
We were very honored with a visit from President and Mrs. Lincoln on March 26th. Both give their views on the political maneuverings in Washington City before the 1864 Presidential Election. As always, the president was able to guide us through a confusing part of our history and explain the events in very plain terms. Mrs. Lincoln provided insight into how some of the politicians were using social events to their advantage or to get to her husband. We want to thank both President and Mrs. Lincoln for honoring us with both their time and insight.

HE’S BEEN HERE BEFORE
Our speaker for April will provide a look at the past through the eyes of an 1860’s farmer in Washington, Michigan. His name is Loren Andrus, the owner of the Octagon House. Taking two years to build, the local landmark was completed in 1860. Mr. Andrus owned over 300 acres and was a very active member of the community. He was an abolitionist as well as a Republican and supporter of Lincoln. Both his son and nephew were involved in the Civil War. This first-person presentation should help us to understand family life in Michigan during the war and the efforts of “the folks back home.” Although they are not speaking, a delightful slide presentation has been prepared by the Allens to enhance this effort and I will leave you to guess the name of our speaker.

TIME FOR A NOFI NOTE
When John G. Nicolay, Lincoln’s secretary, was drafted in 1864, he hired a substitute, Hiram Child, a black man from North Carolina who was later killed in action.

Please plan to join us on Wednesday, April 30th at 7:30 p.m. at Rochester College – 800 W. Avon Rd., Rochester Hills

Bill

  


 

Photo: Private of Company F., 4th Michigan Infantry, U.S.A. Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division


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